Bellingham photographer Paul K. Anderson recently traveled to the Westshore Terminal in British Columbia to document what a coal export facility looks like. His images are an arresting preview of what could be in store for Longview, Bellingham, and other communities.

paul k anderson_chuckanut conservancy_dozer

Bigger version here. (Copyright Paul K. Anderson, Chuckanut Conservancy. Used with permission.)

The photos below provide a good sense for just how dirty these facilities are.

  • The coal dust is virtually impossible to contain. Even on a calm day, it blackens the roads, equipment, and ships, and it spreads onto the water.

    paul k anderson_chuckanut conservancy_interior

    Bigger version here. (Copyright Paul K. Anderson, Chuckanut Conservancy. Used with permission.)

    paul k anderson_chuckanut conservancy_ship

    Bigger version here. (Copyright Paul K. Anderson, Chuckanut Conservancy. Used with permission.)

    paul k anderson_chuckanut conservancy_interior2

    Bigger version here. (Copyright Paul K. Anderson, Chuckanut Conservancy. Used with permission.)

    The Westshore Terminal ships roughly 24 million tons of coal each year. The facility proposed for Cherry Point, near Bellingham, would initially ship the same amount, but could easily be expanded to twice that capacity. The facility planned for the Columbia River at Longview could ship 60 million tons or more per year.