Sightline’s Board of Directors holds ultimate responsibility for Sightline’s governance, leadership, and strategic direction. Its members are a diverse group of community leaders from across Cascadia who volunteer their time to help advance Sightline’s mission. Trustees are volunteers who serve on Sightline’s director-chaired committees to help support Sightline’s success.

Board of Directors

Trustees

Board of Directors

  • Rodney L. Brown, Jr. is a partner with Cascadia Law Group, one of the leading environmental law firms in the Pacific Northwest.  He works on many environmental issues, ranging from pollution control regulations to natural resource management.  He was the principal author of Washington’s Superfund law, and he has served on many governmental commissions, including those that led to the creation of the Growth Management Act and the Regulatory Reform Act.  He most recently served on the Governor’s Climate Action Team and the Washington State Blue Ribbon Commission on Transportation.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/rodbrown/
  • Shaw L. Canale has spent her career in community-grounded and values-centric economic investment. Before retiring in 2014 to Whidbey Island, Washington, she spent four years as CEO of Mountain BizWorks, a small nonprofit in Asheville, North Carolina, that provides training and capital to small businesses located in the state’s rural mountain communities. From 1997 to 2007, she was Executive Director and CEO of Cascadia Revolving Fund, a certified double-bottom-line community development financial institution (CDFI) fueling urban and rural entrepreneurs in Washington and Oregon with capital and support. Beginning in 2006, Shaw initiated and led the two-year-long merger of Cascadia Revolving Fund with ShoreBank Enterprise Pacific. She then served as Vice President of the Board of Directors of the merged company, ShoreBank Enterprise Cascadia, from 2007 to 2009. And in 2007, she founded The Shaw Company to offer management consulting services to nonprofits and CDFIs. Her early career was in retail banking, primarily in the Seattle area, after having attended the Pacific Coast Banking School at the University of Washington in Seattle.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/shawcanale/
  • Mark Cliggett has been a Seattle resident for more than 30 years, and associated with Sightline since its early days. A former Microsoft manager, Mark was a co-founder of Bright Water School - a K-8 elementary school in Seattle - and Angels with Attitude - a hybrid venture/angel fund focused on sustainability. In his free time, Mark enjoys long trail races and has completed UTMB and Western States.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/markcligget/
  • Alan Durning, executive director, founded Northwest Environment Watch in 1993, which became Sightline Institute in 2006. Alan’s current topics of focus include carbon pricing, housing affordability, and democracy reform. He has also written in recent years about parkingMaking Sustainability Legalcar-free livingbike-friendlinesselectric bikes, and climate fairness. Durning has written or contributed to nine Sightline books, including Unlocking Home: Three Keys to Affordable CommunitiesCascadia Scorecard 2007Tax ShiftStuff: The Secret Lives of Everyday Things, and the award-winning This Place on Earth: Home and Practice of Permanence. Prior to founding Sightline, Durning was a senior researcher at Worldwatch Institute. There, he studied the human dimensions of sustainability and wrote the award-winning book How Much Is Enough?, as well as chapters in seven State of the World reports and articles in hundreds of other publications. A sought-after speaker, he has lectured at the White House, major universities, and conferences on five continents. In addition to his passion for sustainability, Alan is a music fiend and a lover of outdoor pursuits, especially mountaineering and cycling. Read Alan’s full bio, find his latest research here, and email him at alandurning [at] sightline [dot] org.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/alan-durning/
  • Molly Keating is the owner of Molly Keating Mediation and Facilitation. For the past twenty years she has helped hundreds of organizations, individuals, and teams untangle their knots. Molly has aided the development of the Citizens Initiative Review process in Oregon, serving as a moderator for the citizen panels. She is also a mediation teacher and coach for private clients and businesses and for the State of Oregon’s volunteer small claims court mediators. Prior to doing this work, Molly lived on the Navajo Indian Reservation in New Mexico, where she worked for the Indian Health Service. She holds a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Washington and a BA in International Relations from Stanford University. Molly and her physician husband live in Portland, Oregon, and have three grown sons.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/mollykeating/
  • Kristin Martinez is a serial entrepreneur who has spent the past 2 decades working with new ventures as an entrepreneur, investor, director and advisor.  She is the founder of Sound Point Ventures, LLC, a venture development and management company operating in Seattle, Washington and Albuquerque, New Mexico since 1998.  Through Sound Point, Kristin co-founded Angels with Attitude, the first active angel fund focused on sustainability. She was a founding member of Seraph Capital, a Seattle angel network for women, served as an Advisory Board member of the University of Washington chapter of Net Impact, and as a University of Washington MBA Program Mentor.  Kristin is currently a director of Oscilla Power, and an advisor to OneEnergyRenewables, both Seattle startups.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/kristinmartinez/
  • Craig McKibben is a retired software executive and engineer. In 1981 he helped start the Seattle software company WRQ, and he played a key role in WRQ’s entry into new markets. In 2001 he led the spin-out of WRQ’s networking division to form NetMotion Wireless Inc. He served on the Washington Trails Association board for eight years and was board chair for two, and he also worked with the Seattle Y to start the BOLD/GOLD outdoor leadership program. "My two retirement goals are to get more people, especially kids, outdoors; and to do something about climate change. Outdoor activities teach personal responsibility and foster a love of the natural world, which inspires people to be good stewards of the earth. Climate change is the overarching issue of our times." Craig and his wife Sarah have three grown children and live in Seattle. A native of the Northwest, he retains a lifelong interest in climbing and skiing, and he is a longtime member of the American Alpine Club and the Access Fund.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/craigmckibben/
  • Gordon Price, of Vancouver, BC, is Director of the City Program at Simon Fraser University. He served as City Councillor from 1986 to 2002 and sat on the boards of METRO VANCOUVER and TransLink, the regional transportation authority. In 2009, he was appointed by the Mayor of Vancouver as a member of the “Greenest City Action Team.” Gordon lectures and writes widely on urban development, design, and transportation issues in Canada and the US. His blog is at pricetags.wordpress.com.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/gordon-price/
  • Kamala Rao, chair of the board of directors, has lived the majority of her life throughout Cascadia. She grew up in Washington and Alaska, and she earned her undergraduate degree in Oregon and her graduate degree in urban planning in British Columbia. Kamala has also served on the board of the People’s Waterfront Coalition and has been active in environmental issues throughout the Cascadia region for many years. Her urban planning career, which has included both private and public sector work, has been focused on working with communities to create a more sustainable transportation system. She and her husband Bryn Davidson, who designs and builds low-energy homes, live in Vancouver, BC.  Kamala currently works for TransLink, Metro Vancouver’s regional transportation authority. Her background also includes several years working for a communications firm.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/kamala-rao/
  • Mark Trahant is the 20th Atwood Chair of Journalism at the University of Alaska Anchorage. He is also a writer, video producer and Twitter poet. Trahant was recently a Kaiser Media Fellow and is the former editor of the editorial page for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Mark is a member of Idaho’s Shoshone-Bannock Tribe and a former president of the Native American Journalists Association. He is the author of The Last Great Battle of the Indian Wars, about Henry Jackson, Forrest Gerard and the campaign for American Indian self-determination.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/mark-trahant/
  • Christopher Troth chairs Sightline’s Finance and Audit Committee and serves as Sightline's Treasurer. A resident of Seattle since 1993, he is a private investor and occasional restorer of old houses. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College.

      

    http://www.sightline.org/author/christ/
  • June Wilson, is executive director and a trustee of Quixote Foundation. She joined the foundation in 2007, bringing 22 years of experience in performing arts, cultural organizing, nonprofit operations, and philanthropy. Her prior ventures included serving as executive director for the Minnesota Dance Alliance in Minneapolis, and as chief operations officer for National Performance Network in New Orleans. June’s extensive background as a dance performer and choreographer informs the way she thinks about all of her work. She has also participated in several leadership programs, served on several non-profit boards, and has consulted independently. A native of Inglewood, California, June currently lives in Seattle. Quixote Foundation—and June—want to see free people in fair societies on a healthy planet.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/junewilson/

Trustees

  • Jennifer H. Allen, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Public Administration and a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Sustainable Solutions at Portland State University. Her research interests focus on sustainable economic development and collaborative approaches to natural resource management. Jennifer served as the Director of Portland State’s Institute for Sustainable Solutions from 2012-2015, and she has previously worked at the World Bank, Ecotrust, and the Oregon Economic and Community Development Department. She currently serves as an Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commissioner and has previously served on the boards of the Oregon Forest Resources Institute, Shorebank Pacific, Portland Energy Conservation Inc., Illahee, the Portland Sustainability Institute, Friends of Forest Park, and the Food Alliance. Jennifer lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband and enjoys hiking, cycling, kayaking, and spending time in their cabin at the Oregon Coast.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/jenniferallen/
  • Eric Froines is a general and thoracic surgeon at Group Health in Seattle. In addition to his clinical responsibilities, his interest in organizational and individual development has led to many other roles in leadership, governance, coaching, communication, and wellness. He has served for nine years on the board of Group Health Permanente and as President of the Seattle Surgical Society. He believes that the Northwest’s natural resources, wealth, and progressive culture present an opportunity to be a model of intelligent design and leadership for the region and our entire country. Eric and his partner Amy live in Seattle with four children, five chickens, and a cat.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/efroines/
  • Ruth Lipscomb is a retired software engineer who devotes her energy to supporting innovative nonprofit organizations. She is a co-founding board member of the Progress Alliance of Washington, and serves on the boards of Fuse Washington and the Fuse Innovation Fund. She is a member of the Women Donors Network and co-chairs their Progressive Political Infrastructure circle. Ruth is passionate about addressing the root causes of our society’s most pressing problems, and focuses on the areas of climate change, reproductive health, civil rights, economic justice, and money in politics. She enjoys spending time with her husband and grown daughter, traveling, tending to her garden, fostering kittens for the Seattle Humane Society, and trying to read all the books she collects.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/ruthlipscomb/
  • John McGarry recently moved to Seattle after a 25-year career as an investment banker in New York, Hong Kong, and Chicago. His most recent role was as a senior banker raising capital for US companies in the Healthcare, Consumer Products, and Retail industries. John is a partner at Social Venture Partners and currently serves on the environmental new grant committee. He was a Fellow in the Northwest Conservation Philanthropy Fellowship program in 2015 and is a member of Element 8, a clean-tech angel investor group. Outside of his environmental pursuits, John has a keen interest in music and the arts. He is currently chair of the board of trustees of Interlochen Center for the Arts, an arts educational and cultural institution located in Michigan. John holds an MBA from the University of Chicago and a BA in Economics from Northwestern University. He is an avid cyclist, skier, and hiker.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/johnmcgarry/
  • Jason Pretty Boy is a Hunkpapa/Oglala Lakota (Sioux) Tribal member from the Rock Creek District on the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North and South Dakota. He was raised in the southern Idaho farm area, with the nearest town being Declo. Growing up on the ranch imbued him with the understanding that this is the only planet we have at this time, and if we don’t work to practice sustainable methods, we will render it unlivable. He has an AAS in Tribal Management/Business Management from United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck, North Dakota, and a Bachelors in Political Science with an emphasis in Public Policy from Boise State University in Boise, Idaho. His work experience ranges from community radio stations to non-profit organizations, sitting at the crossroads of economy and ecology. Jason is married to a wonderful Idaho transplant from Michigan named Sydney. They have three daughters, ranging in age from 10 months to 18 years.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/jasonprettyboy/
  • Trish Weber is a free range climate justice activist who has called Cascadia home for over 20 years. The primary focus of her activism work involves allying with indigenous peoples who are fighting extreme energy projects in their communities, particularly Canadian tar sands mining and infrastructure projects. In 2010, she co-founded All Against the Haul, a coalition of grassroots organizations, communities, individuals, and tribes that successfully prevented ExxonMobil from constructing a permanent industrial transportation corridor for oversized tar sands mining equipment through pristine mountainous areas in ID and MT. She currently serves on the US campaign steering committee for Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN), an organization devoted to promoting the voices of indigenous women in global climate justice discussions. Previous experience also includes 5 years with the Women Donors Network, where she lead the Earth Circle and served on the Board of Directors. She is a semi-retired electrical engineer who lives with her husband in Corvallis OR. Yoga, Shakespeare, and walks in the forest help her maintain sanity in this most insane of times.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/trishweber/
  • Rita Wong lives on the unceded Coast Salish territories otherwise known as Vancouver, BC, Canada, where her work investigates the relationships between social justice, ecology, and decolonization through writing and witnessing. A poet-scholar who learns from and with water, Rita has authored four books of poetry: undercurrent, sybil unrest (co-written with Larissa Lai), forage, and monkeypuzzle. She works as an Associate Professor in Critical and Cultural Studies at Emily Carr University of Art + Design, where she developed a humanities course focused on water, for which she received a fellowship from the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society. Her writing has circulated through anthologies such as The Winter We Danced: Voices From the Past, the Future, and the Idle No More Movement; The Enpipe Line; Regreen: New Canadian Ecological Poetry; Prismatic Publics: Innovative Canadian Women’s Poetry and Poetics; Thinking with Water (essay co-authored with Dorothy Christian); in journals like Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education and Society; and more. Wong works to support Indigenous revitalization, including solidarity with the Unist'ot'en Camp, the Tsleil Waututh Sacred Trust, and efforts to stop the Site C dam in northern BC, among other urgent land and water-based struggles.
    http://www.sightline.org/author/ritawong/