Press

Sightline Institute is available to help the media in any way we can. Our researchers and communications team can provide commentary, interviews, story ideas, background information, or serve as expert sources. We work on a range of topics in the northwest, from climate policy and energy use to population and human health. If we can’t comment on an issue ourselves, chances are we know someone who can.

Skip down to press releases.

Media Contact:

Serena Larkin, Communications Associate
206-447-1880 x 111, serena [at] sightline [dot] org

Experts:

Clark Williams-Derry, Director of Programs
206-447-1880 x 106, clark [at] sightline [dot] org
Expertise: Climate & Energy, Human Health, Sprawl & Transportation, Pollution & Toxics

Eric de Place, Policy Director
206-447-1880 x 105, eric [at] sightline [dot] org
Expertise: Climate Policy, Forests & Wildlife, Coal Exports

Anna Fahey, Senior Communications Strategist
anna [at] sightline [dot] org
Expertise: Climate Change Messaging

Jennifer Langston, Researcher & News Editor
jennifer [at] sightline [dot] org
Expertise: Transit, Stormwater

Alan Durning, Executive Director
206.447.1880, mieko [at] sightline [dot] org
Expertise: State & Federal Policy, Climate & Energy, Economy, Sustainable Living, Green Jobs

Recent Press Releases

Report: Peabody Energy’s Northwest Coal Export Plans Would Lose Billions at Today’s Prices

SEATTLE, WA.///October 22, 2013///The steep drop in Pacific Rim coal prices over the past two years has put Powder River Basin coal miner Peabody Energy at risk of massive losses if it tried to ship coal through the proposed Gateway Pacific terminal outside of Bellingham, Washington, according to a new report by the nonprofit Sightline Institute. Sightline’s analysis shows that, in today’s market, Peabody Energy would lose roughly $10 per ton if it tried to ship its coal to Asia through the proposed Gateway Pacific terminal. And if Peabody tried to utilize the full 24 million metric tons of annual … read more »

Report: Proposed Fossil Fuel Exports from British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon Would End Region’s Green Reputation

Potential Carbon Emissions from Proposed New Exports Equivalent to Seven Keystone XLs.

For immediate release: May 15, 2013 The combined coal, oil, and natural gas projects proposed in British Columbia and the American Northwest would, if built, be capable of delivering fossil fuels loaded with 761 million metric tons of carbon dioxide annually (see chart below). A new report by Seattle-based think tank Sightline Institute, available online at sightline.org/FossilFuelsNorthwest, finds that the 16 new fossil fuel export proposals in the Pacific Northwest have a potential carbon footprint equivalent to: More than seven Keystone XL pipelines at initial build-out Twelve times as much as all the climate-warming gases emitted in British Columbia More … read more »

Report: Ambre Energy Unlikely to Succeed with U.S. Coal Exporting Plans

Ambre Energy, an Australian company that is currently touting plans for a pair of controversial coal export terminal sites in Washington and Oregon, faces mounting financial, regulatory and other challenges that make it unlikely to deliver on its promises in the U.S., according to a new report for the nonprofit Sightline Institute. read more »

Report: Northwest Gasoline Consumption Shifts into Reverse

For immediate release: August 29, 2012 Read the report. Seattle, WA – As northwesterners head to the pump for Labor Day, a new report shows our appetite for gasoline a waning. After more than a decade of rising and volatile prices at the gas pump, northwesterners’ consumption of motor fuel is now on the decline. But high oil prices meant that the region still spent a record $22 billion on petroleum in 2011. Last year, each resident of Oregon and Washington burned an average of 7.2 gallons of gas per week—the lowest level in nearly 50 years. And per capita … read more »

Has the Northwest reached “Peak Gas?”

Regional gasoline consumption has been flat for more than a decade

Through boom and bust, and despite steady population growth, total gasoline consumption in Oregon and Washington has remained essentially flat since 1999, according to a new report from Sightline Institute. Yet the two states still spent $16.6 billion on petroleum in 2010 and are on track to spend as much as $22 billion this year—an all-time record. read more »

Report: Washington Coal Exports Mean More Coal Consumption in China

A new report released Tuesday shows proposed coal export terminals in Washington would result in more coal being burned in China. The report’s claims are a direct contradiction to proponents of the coal terminals, who say shipping United States coal to China would have no effect on the country’s reliance on coal power. read more »

Economics Textbooks Botch Climate Change

Several popular economics textbooks contain incorrect information about climate change science and policy, ranging from misleading to flat-out wrong. That’s according to a new review of 16 of the most popular college economics textbooks, written by Dr. Yoram Bauman, environmental economist at the University of Washington and fellow at the sustainability think tank, Sightline Institute. read more »

Precarious Improvement for Northwest Wildlife

Updated regional index shows mixed news for key wildlife populations.

After precipitous declines over the previous century, some of the iconic wildlife populations of the Pacific Northwest have notched tentative gains in recent years. That’s according to a new report by Sightline Institute’s Cascadia Scorecard—a regional progress report on sustainability in the region. read more »

Report: Tougher Conditions for Northwest Families

Recession erased two decades of gains for middle class

Recession erased two decades of gains for middle class. read more »

Easing Off the Gas: Northwesterners Using Less Gasoline

Regional gas consumption declines by 180 million gallons in 2008

Total gasoline consumption fell 180 million gallons in 2008, the greatest drop since 1980. Per-capita use has been on the decline for eight of the last nine years, and is at a four-decade low. Moreover, Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) for 2009 show northwesterners have already driven 643,000 miles fewer than they did during the same time frame in 2007. read more »